Question: Is It May I Have Or Can I Have?

Is May you proper English?

The start of a sentence with “May you” is a phrase which can be applied as such to begin in a sentence.

It’s correct and not wrong.

The use of “may” talks about possible actions or happenings in future..

Is could you please rude?

First of all, “could you please” sounds more polite and less rude. When we say “Can you please…”, the question actually asks the subject whether they are capable of doing something. … On the contrary, “Could you please…” is a request which may be granted by the subject under favourable circumstances.

Can or may I go to the bathroom?

“Can” denotes ability. “Can I go to the restroom?” means “Am I capable of going to the restroom?” This is probably not what was intended. This distinction is often ignored in casual conversation, but “may” is both correct and more polite.

Can I help you vs May I help you?

“How may I help you?” is what one would ask, for instance, if serving at a shop of some sort. “How can I help you?” is what one would ask if unsure about the nature or type of assistance one can offer.

Why is it May I instead of can I?

But the permission use of can is not in fact incorrect in standard English. The only difference between the two verbs is that one is more polite than the other. In informal contexts it’s perfectly acceptable to use can; in formal situations it would be better to use may.

When to say may I?

As for May I at the start of a sentence, its commonest use is as a rhetorical device – typically in a speech or official meeting – for introducing a statement or suggestion (rather than a question): May I say how deeply honoured I am to be invited to chair the NCVO.

Can I ask you or may I ask you?

May I ask you a question? Asking for permission. In addition, “may” version is more polite than the “can” version. Realistically speaking, both ask for permission and neither is offensive, but yes, “may” is still more polite than “can.”

Could vs May grammar?

Could has the same meaning as may when making requests. It is equally polite to say “Could I leave early?” or “May I leave early?” Could is used with any subject to ask for permission. … When making a request using may, only I can be the subject.

Why is can I go to the bathroom wrong?

So while yes, asking “may I go to the bathroom?” is asking for permission, asking the “can” question is actually referring to “are the conditions of me being able to the bathroom met?” which includes but is not exclusive just having permission. …

Can you or could you polite?

If you are requesting something for yourself, all of these forms are possible. May and might are considered to be more polite, more formal or more tentative than can and could, but can and could are usually preferred in normal usage.

Can you or will you?

May implies that you are asking for permission. Can implies that you are questioning somebody’s ability. Will implies that you are seeking an answer about the future.

Can I speak to or may I speak to?

“May I speak to …” asks for permission. “Can I speak to …” says you’re not asking for permission, you want so speak to … if it’s at all possible. You have a better chance of getting through to … if you use “can.” No, actually there’s no difference, except that “may” marks you as a stickler for formal grammar.

Can I or may I Which is correct?

Which do you think is correct? If you use “Can I…” you are literally asking if you have the ability to pick the book up from the person’s hands, walk away with it, and return it later. If you use “May I…” then you are asking permission to use the book and bring it back at a later time.

Would you or could you?

But I would suppose that “would” is more polite, because it expresses the idea of probability, and of willingness, and of the desire that something be done, whereas “could” is more in the realm of ability (yes I can). And according to the American Heritage Dictionary, “would” is used to make a polite request.

Can I request or request may?

In spoken English, a request for permission is generally answered with can, cannot, or can’t, rather than with may or may not, even if the question was formed using may.