Question: What Imagery Tells Us That The Speaker Also Suspects That The Tiger Could Be A Demonic Creation?

What does the Tyger symbolize?

The ‘Tyger’ is a symbolic tiger which represents the fierce force in the human soul.

It is created in the fire of imagination by the god who has a supreme imagination, spirituality and ideals.

The anvil, chain, hammer, furnace and fire are parts of the imaginative artist’s powerful means of creation..

What two questions does the speaker ask at the beginning of the lamb?

The poem begins with the question, “Little Lamb, who made thee?” The speaker, a child, asks the lamb about its origins: how it came into being, how it acquired its particular manner of feeding, its “clothing” of wool, its “tender voice.” In the next stanza, the speaker attempts a riddling answer to his own question: …

What are you told directly about the Speaker of the lamb?

What are you told directly about the speaker of “The Lamb”? … The speaker of “The Lamb” is innocent, whereas the speaker of “The Tyger” is experienced.

What are the 7 types of imagery?

Terms in this set (7)kinesthetic. movement.olfactory. smell.visual. sight.gustatory. taste.organic. feeling inside.tactile. touch.auditory. sound.

What is image in the poem?

What Is Imagery in Poetry? In poetry, imagery is a vivid and vibrant form of description that appeals to readers’ senses and imagination.

Which kind of imagery is used in the Tyger?

The imagery of fire evokes the fierceness and potential danger of the tiger, which itself represents what is evil or dreaded. “Tyger Tyger, burning bright / In the forests of the night,” Blake begins, conjuring the image of a tiger’s eyes burning in the darkness.

What question does the Speaker of the Tyger ask over and over what answer is implied?

What question does the speaker of “The Tyger” ask over and over? What answer is implied? “Frame thy fearful symmetry?” That the Devil has created it.

Who is the speaker in the Tyger?

SPEAKER/VOICE The speaker of the poem, who is likely Blake himself, is talking directly to the tiger, asking the question of how he was created. He is in awe of the tiger’s beauty, but also quite afraid of his power and ferociousness.

What question is the narrator asking of the lamb?

It is as if the narrator is talking to the Lamb: “Little Lamb,who made thee?” He answers his own question, saying that if the lamb does not know, then he will be the one that tells the lamb who created him. The creator also “calls himself a Lamb; He is meek and he is mild, (ll. 14-15)” and became a child as well.

Why is Tyger Spelt with ay instead of an I?

The Tyger is a poem by British poet William Blake. The poem is about a tiger. It is spelled with a “y” in the poem because Blake used the old English spelling.

What is an example of persona?

When a character or narrator through whom the author speaks in a literary work is a persona-the voice of the author. Sometimes, the persona is a person involved in the plot; sometimes, the persona is an outside “voice” with knowledge of the events that occurred.

What does the tiger represent in the poem The Tyger?

The ‘Tyger’ is a symbolic tiger which represents the fierce force in the human soul. It is created in the fire of imagination by the god who has a supreme imagination, spirituality and ideals.

Where in the poem does the speaker wonder if the tiger may have been created by God what imagery tells us that the tiger could also be a demonic creation?

Where in the poem does the speaker wonder if the tiger may have been created by God? What imagery tells us that the tiger could also be a demonic creation? Right at the middle the speaker wonders if the tiger was created by God. There is a lot of imagery that tells us the tiger could be a demonic creation.

Why does the poet consider it daring to have created the Tiger?

The first and last quatrains are almost identical, with subtle differences in their punctuation and the change of the word “could” to “dare.” This is important because the four stanzas in between characterize the creator that made the tiger as being daring—that is, the tiger is a fearsome creature and its creator must …

Why are the lamb and the tiger compared?

The image of the lamb evokes the feeling of serenity and purity, while the tiger evokes power and fierceness. This can further imply to the mind that the Lamb represents innocence in the world and the Tyger illustrates experience.

What does Fearful Symmetry mean?

(This might help to explain Blake’s reference to ‘fearful symmetry’: he is describing not only the remarkable patterns on the tiger’s skin and fur which humans have learned to go in fear of, but the ‘symmetry’ between the innocent lamb on the one hand and the fearsome tiger on the other.

What is the theme of the poem The Tiger?

The main theme of William Blake’s poem “The Tyger” is creation and origin. The speaker is in awe of the fearsome qualities and raw beauty of the tiger, and he rhetorically wonders whether the same creator could have also made “the Lamb” (a reference to another of Blake’s poems).

What does the speaker ask in the Tyger?

In “The Tyger,” the speaker asks repeatedly who made the tiger. In this case, he wants to know what God crafted the tiger’s “fearful symmetry.” He asks what “dread hand & dread feet” created the frightening animal and what hammer and anvil pounded such a mighty beast into shape.

What is the central image of the poem?

As such, pinpointing the central image of a poem is a two-step process that integrates the theme and major emotional impact of the poem with a concrete image that manifests that theme or impact. After those steps, the central image should be able to be described by at least one sentence.

What is the tone of the poem The Tiger?

The tone of William Blake’s “The Tyger” moves from awe, to fear, to irreverent accusation, to resigned curiosity. In the first eleven lines of the poem, readers can sense the awe that the speaker of the poem holds for the tiger as a work of creation.

What does sinews mean in the Tyger?

“And what shoulder, and what art could twist the sinews of thy heart?” In these lines, the “thy” is referring to the tyger. “Could twist the sinews of thy (Tyger’s) heart.” Blake used the word “twisted” to remind us of the free will God made man with.