Question: Why Did The Duke Kill His Last Duchess?

What does all smiles stopped in line 46 imply?

The final lines of the poem confirm the Duke’s obsession with power: He is a possessive, controlling man.

Because the Duchess “smiled” (line 43) at others, the Duke “gave commands” (line 45) so that “all smiles stopped together” (line 46), which may be a euphemism for having the Duchess killed or at least silenced..

What flaw does the Duke identify in his last duchess?

Using abundant detail, Browning leads the reader to conclude that the Duke found fault with his former wife because she did not reserve her attentions for him, his rank, and his power.

What bothered the Duke about the Duchess’s smile?

The duke wanted his wife to smile at no one but himself. The duchess’ smiles to the other men aroused an anger in the duke so powerful that he gave commands to have her killed. His jealousy stemmed from his perceived lack of control that he had over his wife.

How did the last duchess die?

It isn’t explicitly spelled out, but we can reasonably infer that the duchess was killed on the orders of her husband. As he explains to the Count’s emissary in chilling, matter-of-fact language, he gave commands, and then all the Duchess’s smiles stopped.

What does Duke say about dowry?

Near the end of the monologue he says, “I repeat, / The Count your master’s known munificence / Is ample warrant that no just pretence / Of mine for dowry will be disallowed.” So he is repeating what he has already told this man, showing that the dowry was uppermost in his mind.

Why does the Duke hide the Duchess painting behind a curtain?

He draws a curtain to reveal a painting of a woman, explaining that it is a portrait of his late wife; he invites his guest to sit and look at the painting. As they look at the portrait of the late Duchess, the Duke describes her happy, cheerful and flirtatious nature, which had displeased him.

What does the last duchess mean?

My Last DuchessThe Objectification of Women “My Last Duchess” is a dramatic monologue in which the Duke of Ferrara tells the messenger of his potential wife’s family about his previous wife, the “last” duchess of the poem’s title. … The painting is meant to aggrandize the duke rather than honor the woman it portrays.

Why does the speaker in Porphyria’s Lover kill her?

He feared she might not feel the same way she felt for him the next day as she did that night. His was an apparently insane mind, for he decided to kill her. By doing so, he thought, he might be able to seize that moment forever. If Porphyria died while she was united with him, he would never lose her.

Who killed the Duchess?

This experience leads Bosola to turn against the brothers, and he decides to take up the cause of “revenge for the Duchess of Malfi” (5.2). The Cardinal confesses his part in the killing of the Duchess to his mistress, Julia, then murders her with a poisoned Bible.

How is the Duke controlling in My Last Duchess?

The Duke keeps a painting of the Duchess behind a curtain which “none puts by” but him. In this way, the Duke has power over the Duchess in that he controls who now sees her and what stories people hear about her.

Why does the Duke most likely point out his statue of Neptune taming a sea horse to his visitor?

He even had his first wife murdered because she didn’t behave how he wanted her to. The most telling words are that Neptune was “taming a sea-horse”; this appeals greatly to the Duke’s desire for taming and controlling all around him, especially things like the rare sea-horse.

Who passed without Much the same smile?

Lines 43-45 Much the same smile? The Duke admits to his listener (who is this guy, anyway?) that the Duchess was sweet to him – she did smile at him whenever he passed by her.

What does the Duke reveal about himself?

The Duke reveals himself to be an emotionally cold, calculating, materialistic, haughty, aristocratic connoisseur; on the positive side, he is a patron of such artists as Fra Pandolf and Claus of Innsbruck (both fictional).

What is the main message in My Last Duchess?

“My Last Duchess” is all about power: the political and social power wielded by the speaker (the Duke) and his attempt to control the domestic sphere (his marriage) in the same way that he rules hi…

What is the irony in my last Duchess?

The overarching irony in Browning’s “My Last Duchess” is that it really is not about the duchess, but instead about the controlling, jealous, and arrogant nature of the duke. In his monologue describing a painting of his former wife, the duke introduces us to his dark and sinister qualities.

What does the Duke mean by the question who passed without Much the same smile in lines 44 45?

 The Duke acknowledges that the Duchess smiled “no doubt” (line 43) whenever she passed him. However, the Duke perceives that other people also received “[m]uch the same smile” (line 45). The Duke’s desire to be the only one who receives the Duchess’s smiles suggests that he is jealous and possessive.

Why was the Duke dissatisfied with his last duchess?

Ans- The Duke was dissatisfied with his last Duchess because he thought that she was not completed focused on him and was flirting with other people. The Duchess would smile at other people but the Duke wanted complete control and was jealous when the Duchess was friendly towards other people.

How did the Duke feel about his last duchess?

The duke is upset that everything pleases the duchess. She is too innocent and too generous with her approval and too easily impressed. He later says that her holding any kindness in equal standing with his affection and his gifts “disgusts” him, though he refuses to “stoop” to tell the duchess why he is upset.